1.     Mi trovi su: Homepage #3414563
    DR.com ha chiuso oggi i battenti, questa la spiegazioncina presente su FGNonline.com.
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    Radar: What's Next?

    Online: FGN Online editorial director Colin Campbell takes a look at the demise of a leading online games magazine.

    Yesterday's announcement by Imagine Media that it is closing Daily Radar is being presented as a "shock" by some commentators. It is nothing of the sort. Imagine has produced a decent, popular web destination that's showed consistent if unspectacular readership growth since its launch. Its commercial managers have attempted to find new ways to bring revenues in. Its costs have been managed prudently. And yet there is no sign of the kinds of revenues needed to support a large-scale publishing venture of this nature.

    The choices were simple. At least two more years of losses, with the possibility of operational profitability. Or closure. Given that the shareholders of its parent company Future are demanding Results Now, the way forward looked bleak.

    Was Daily Radar the greatest game website ever devised? No, it had its faults. But it was comprehensive, informative and often funny. It was worth visiting every day and care was taken over its editorial craftsmanship. Its writers displayed a knack of balancing their own love of the subject, with a healthy cynicism about the industry it served.

    No matter what that team tried, their fate was sealed by an environment entirely beyond their control. This product did not fail the market. The market failed it.

    The losers here are a bunch of decent journalists who did a fine job. And the commercial team who tried everything to bring in much-needed dollars. (Those of you who whined about pop-ups and weird ad configurations can relax now. You'll be plagued no more. But then again, you've one less editorial resource to use.)

    Other losers are the readers. FGN Online recently ran a survey in which we asked which websites our readers most visited. Daily Radar came joint-second (with GameSpot and behind IGN, both of which are excellent websites). I suspect virtually any games website running the same survey would find similar results. This was a product that the public embraced.

    Other losers are the dwindling number of Daily Radar's competitors. Only the most immature scribbler at IGN or GameSpot or whatever will view this closure as good news. Likely, the gleeful rubbing of hands we'll undoubtedly see on newsgroups and chat-rooms, will be the work of frustrated no-hopers and out-of-work hacks. They won't be professional journalists who know how tough this business is right now.

    I spoke to the editor of a leading professional games website this morning. His view is that the elimination of bad competitors is good for business. But the retirement of good ones simply adds to the dangerous (and wrong) view that well-funded daily websites have no commercial future. If Imagine has lost faith in the online space, how long until Ziff, or Dennis come to the same conclusion?

    If bus shelters, beer-mats and bottle-tops are useful advertising vehicles, then so surely are well-informed, entertaining, informative specialist websites written by professionals. Let's hope that when games marketers look for smart ways to sell their PS2, Xbox and Gamecube games in the future, they'll have someplace to turn other than hyper-expensive cable TV channels, wasteful 'style' magazines or the dwindling number of games publications
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    A voi ogni commento.
  2. The Bot
    The Bot  
        Mi trovi su: Homepage #3414565
    Dispiace molto anche a me per la chiusura di DR.com...
    Non saprei dare una spiegazione generale per la chiusura di tutti questi siti, come dopotutto non saprei darla per la fine di altrettante riviste cartacee.
    Spero solo che sia un fatto momentaneo.

    Ciao.
  3. The Bot
    The Bot  
        Mi trovi su: Homepage #3414569
    Zave ha scritto:
    DR.com ha chiuso oggi i battenti, questa la spiegazioncina presente su FGNonline.com.
    -----------
    Radar: What's Next?

    Online: FGN Online editorial director Colin Campbell takes a look at the demise of a leading online games magazine.

    Yesterday's announcement by Imagine Media that it is closing Daily Radar is being presented as a "shock" by some commentators. It is nothing of the sort. Imagine has produced a decent, popular web destination that's showed consistent if unspectacular readership growth since its launch. Its commercial managers have attempted to find new ways to bring revenues in. Its costs have been managed prudently. And yet there is no sign of the kinds of revenues needed to support a large-scale publishing venture of this nature.

    The choices were simple. At least two more years of losses, with the possibility of operational profitability. Or closure. Given that the shareholders of its parent company Future are demanding Results Now, the way forward looked bleak.

    Was Daily Radar the greatest game website ever devised? No, it had its faults. But it was comprehensive, informative and often funny. It was worth visiting every day and care was taken over its editorial craftsmanship. Its writers displayed a knack of balancing their own love of the subject, with a healthy cynicism about the industry it served.

    No matter what that team tried, their fate was sealed by an environment entirely beyond their control. This product did not fail the market. The market failed it.

    The losers here are a bunch of decent journalists who did a fine job. And the commercial team who tried everything to bring in much-needed dollars. (Those of you who whined about pop-ups and weird ad configurations can relax now. You'll be plagued no more. But then again, you've one less editorial resource to use.)

    Other losers are the readers. FGN Online recently ran a survey in which we asked which websites our readers most visited. Daily Radar came joint-second (with GameSpot and behind IGN, both of which are excellent websites). I suspect virtually any games website running the same survey would find similar results. This was a product that the public embraced.

    Other losers are the dwindling number of Daily Radar's competitors. Only the most immature scribbler at IGN or GameSpot or whatever will view this closure as good news. Likely, the gleeful rubbing of hands we'll undoubtedly see on newsgroups and chat-rooms, will be the work of frustrated no-hopers and out-of-work hacks. They won't be professional journalists who know how tough this business is right now.

    I spoke to the editor of a leading professional games website this morning. His view is that the elimination of bad competitors is good for business. But the retirement of good ones simply adds to the dangerous (and wrong) view that well-funded daily websites have no commercial future. If Imagine has lost faith in the online space, how long until Ziff, or Dennis come to the same conclusion?

    If bus shelters, beer-mats and bottle-tops are useful advertising vehicles, then so surely are well-informed, entertaining, informative specialist websites written by professionals. Let's hope that when games marketers look for smart ways to sell their PS2, Xbox and Gamecube games in the future, they'll have someplace to turn other than hyper-expensive cable TV channels, wasteful 'style' magazines or the dwindling number of games publications
    -------------

    A voi ogni commento.
    E' veramente brutto che uno dei maggiori siti di VG debba chiudere così. :(
  4. Account abbandonato. Fade to black.  
        Mi trovi su: Homepage Homepage #3414572
    lain ha scritto:
    Ma che caz sta succedendo!!!!
    Qui stanno chiudendo un casino di siti!!!
    Beh, sarà ma quelli della old economy la sapevano lunga... ci si chiedeva perchè non ci si preoccupava della new economy...
    "A te t'ha rovinato il team corse" (C) 2004 AlGaloppo
  5.     Mi trovi su: Homepage #3414573
    Ma che caz sta succedendo!!!!
    Qui stanno chiudendo un casino di siti! Beh, sarà ma quelli della old economy la sapevano lunga... ci si chiedeva perchè non ci si preoccupava della new economy



    A me pare che tutta questo proliferare di portali, siti, informazioni on line e altro, insomma tutta questa offerta di "internet", sia un pò campata per aria, nel senso che alla fin fine non c'è poi tutta questa domanda, e questi siti stiano in piedi solo perchè le aziende della "old" economy vogliono "esserci", e sono disposte a finanziare servizi in perdita pur di rimanerci...

    Chiaro che poi quando qualcuno si stanca le teste cascano, e di solito sono sempre i migliori quelli che se ne vanno...
  6. The Bot
    The Bot  
        Mi trovi su: Homepage #3414574
    Dypa77 ha scritto:
    Beh, sarà ma quelli della old economy la sapevano lunga... ci si chiedeva perchè non ci si preoccupava della new economy...
    Niente isterismi...
    Fermo restando che la rete non è mai stata pensata per fare business, è comunque possibile guadagnarci su. Ma ad ogni "ricambio generazionale economico" c'è un periodo di esplosione che rasenta il ridicolo, ed un rapido riassetto verso delle posizioni più umane. Adesso si stanno licenziando le persone di troppo che si erano assunte, si chiudono i siti privi di motivo di essere o semplicemente troppo esosi, in generale si va verso una robusta cura dimagrante.
    E come sempre, nella strage muoiono parecchi innocenti, come appunto dailyradar.
    Si tratta di aspettare fino alla fine dell'anno, imo.

  Daily Radar.com, tutti a casa

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